NY Endodontics & Implantology

What is an Endodontist?

'what is an endodontist'What is an Endodontist?

An Endodontist is a dentist who specializes in root canal treatment, a process by which teeth are preserved through the treatment of the inner soft tissue of the teeth – also known as the pulp. In addition to dental school, those who choose to specialize in endodontics attend another two to three years of schooling in the field. All dentists are trained on how to diagnose and treat pulp related issues, but when teeth are exceptionally difficult to treat, patients are referred to an Endodontist.

How many root canal treatments will I need?

Every case is different, depending on the degree of inflammation and infection, however, most cases require just one root canal treatment. Root canals, or endodontic treatments, have up to a 90% success rate. Before you undergo any form of treatment, we will discuss with you the chances of success so that you may make an informed decision. In most cases, patients will only have to undergo one treatment, but occasionally patients need a second or even a third treatment.

Follow-Up Care

Once your endodontic treatment is complete, we may have you return for periodic check-ins if you had an abscessed tooth, which can take up to two years to fully heal.

How do I know if I need to see an Endodontist?

You won’t always know when the time has come to see an Endodontist. Many people only see one because their general dentist found a problem and referred them. If you know that you have a cracked tooth or painful, infected pulp, you should give us a call – we may be able to help you skip the trip to the general dentist in the first place.

Endodontists are a critical part of the oral health maintenance team! Give us a call at New York Office Phone Number 212-838-2011 to learn more about the importance of saving your natural teeth with root canal therapy!

Oral Cancer Among Men to Increase in 2017

'man thinking about oral cancer'A recent study by the American Cancer Society reports that oral cancer cases in men is expected to increase in 2017 by 4%, while the rate of new cases among women stays the same year over year. “Oral Cancer”, which is a common way to refer to all head and neck cancers, involves cancer of the oral cavity, lips, tongue, pharynx and esophagus.

Unfortunately, oral cancers often go undetected until their later stages when they are more difficult to treat, giving them an even worse reputation than many other cancers.

Oral cancer is more likely in those who:

  • Drink Alcohol Excessively (more than 2 drinks a day for men and more than 1 drink a day for women)
  • Smoke or Chew Tobacco
  • Have HPV (certain strains of the HPV virus are known to cause oral and other cancers)

HPV and Oral Cancer

Along with the rise of HPV among men has come the rise of oral cancers as well. Unfortunately, it has now been estimated that half of U.S. men are infected with HPV. While most of these will not go on to develop cancer, certainly, these increases may continue to create a rise in head and neck cancers until the disease is brought under control.

What You Can Do

Prevention and detection are the most important things when it comes to the fight against oral cancer. With early detection, we can do better for survival rates and, as we have seen with general cancer cases, prevention in the form of abstaining from tobacco and drinking in moderation can reduce the number of cases over time. In order to protect yourself and your family and help us with survival rates, we urge you to see us for an oral cancer screening. It only takes a few minutes for us to examine you – and it could save your life.

For more information on oral cancer, call us at New York Office Phone Number 212-838-2011 or visit oralcancerfoundation.org.

Root Canals BC, AD, and Now!

Root Canals: BC

There is no way of knowing just exactly how long 'ancient toothbrush' has been around. The first traces of root canal therapy can be dated back to second or third century B.C. A human skull was discovered in a desert in Israel. In one of the teeth, they found a bronze wire that scientists believe was used to treat an infected canal. The wire was located at the site of the infection, which is the exact spot that would be targeted during modern day root canal therapy. The archaeologists who discovered the remains believe that the procedure was performed by the Romans, who are said to have invented dentures and crowns.

More Advancements: AD

Evidence shows that from the first century A.D. until the 1600s, the treatment for root canals included the draining of the pulp chambers to relieve pain, and then covering them with a protective coating made from either gold foil or asbestos. Around 1838, the first official root canal instrument was constructed. It was made to allow easier access to the pulp that is located within the root of the tooth. A few years later, around 1847, a safer material known as “gutta percha” was created to use as a filling once the root canal was cleaned out. Both of these materials are still used today by Endodontists.

20th Century Technology

When we entered the 20th century, dental technology advanced. Anesthetics and x-rays were instituted into dental practices, which made treating an infected root canal much easier and safer. These technological advancements also allowed for alternative treatments to pulling teeth. Root canal therapy has advanced so much that it is now a nearly painless procedure!

An infected tooth root is a pain, and can compromise your teeth! We save teeth every day in our office with endodontic therapy – call us at New York Office Phone Number 212-838-2011 for more information.

What is Root Resorption?

'x-ray of jaw'Root resorption happens every day in children – it is the body’s natural process of (re)absorbing tissue. In the case of a child’s mouth, it is what helps them to lose their baby teeth and, in fact, what allows them to have effective orthodontic treatment. The body resorbs tissues that connect the baby teeth to the mouth, and the tooth is then able to fall out. But when we see resorption in adults, it is cause for concern.

Why does resorption happen?

We don’t always know why resorption occurs. Sometimes it is due to trauma to a tooth or severe grinding, sometimes due to overly aggressive orthodontic treatment (too much force was applied to the teeth with braces), but, often, we simply don’t know the cause, and must instead focus on the treatment.

External Cervical Resorption (ECR)

When resorption starts on the outside of the tooth and works its way in, usually up where the tooth meets the gum line, this is known as external resorption. It is the most common type. Patients may see pink spots at first where the enamel is being destroyed, or they may be asymptomatic. If left untreated, this often results in cavities and, eventually, the decay will start to affect the tooth pulp as well. Treatment for ECR typically includes root canal therapy. However, if the damage is too extensive, the tooth may need extraction and replacement with a dental implant.

Internal Resorption

Less common than ECR is internal resorption, which involves the resorption of tissue starting in the root of the tooth. It is often thought to be due to chronic pulp inflammation, and may be asymptomatic. Early treatment is important in order to the save the tooth.

As endodontists, our main goal is always to save your natural teeth, and do so safely and with great care to ensure the best oral health for you in the future. Regular x-rays with your dentist and a call to our office at New York Office Phone Number 212-838-2011 at the first sign of root decay or resorption will help us meet that goal!

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